Museums and Art

Early spring. Thaw, Savrasov

Early spring. Thaw, Savrasov

Early spring. 68x54

Probably there is no longer an artist in the history of Russian art who could discern the beauty of his native nature in any weather and at any time of the year. Beloved by the artist, spring, especially early, according to many, is not the most attractive time for the landscape. Savrasov, on the contrary, paid precisely this period to his work.

The work is full of foreboding awakening. Excited by the arrival of heat, the birds scurry around old nests, the snow is full of grayish yellow heavy tones. Looking at work, the viewer has the illusion that the snow cover is melting before his eyes. The sky may still be completely winter, gloomy and snowy, but constantly growing thawed areas will soon free the earth from the winter carpet.

Despite the apparent poverty of the palette, the master skillfully uses numerous shades to make his work unusually realistic in form and subtle, unusually lyrical in content.

The church, squat huts - have not yet completely freed from snow, but the sun, invisible in the picture, has already freed the roofs of buildings.

Work abounds in blue halftones. They are present in the sky, and are reflected in snow and thawed areas. This spring itself is the main character of the picture.

Most of all the viewer is surprised by the fact that the artist knows how to see beauty in the most ordinary and prosaic landscape. Magically, any landscape in the interpretation of the great master turns into a harmonious and unique masterpiece of fine art.

The work was created during the heyday of the artist's creative powers, when he resolutely abandoned his past addiction to the classic romantic landscape, and directed all his forces to the glorification of Russian nature.

Watch the video: Rundelltown Creek Early Spring Thaw (October 2020).